New Partners in the Snoqualmie Valley

Partnership is a central characteristic of Stewardship Partners’ core values and is one of the reasons why our work has such wide-ranging impact. A great example of partnership is our recent collaboration with Aspect Consulting  to build the Carnation Elementary School Rain Garden.

In the summer of 2017, Owen Reese, a Water Resources Engineer with Aspect Consulting, contacted Stewardship Partners offering design, project management, and hands-on construction expertise for any volunteer opportunities with our 12,000 Rain Gardens program. The Carnation Elementary School Rain Garden provided the perfect project to exercise this exciting partnership.

Planting and engineering design for Carnation Elementary School Rain Garden. Design by Aspect Consulting/ Owen Reese.

Within a month of Owen’s first email, Aspect conducted a detailed soil analysis and sent us a professional garden design and planting plan, which were quickly approved by both school administrators and the school district. Aspect Consulting’s technical expertise immensely helps to complete projects quickly and efficiently. The Aspect team then returned a few months later to install this new rain garden, joining even more volunteers from the Carnation Elementary School Environmental Club. Today, the rain garden flourishes. From this successful rain garden project, we recently heard that that the King County Flood Control District agreed to fund a second rain garden at Carnation Elementary School through their Flood Reduction Fund. We’re thrilled to build this second rain garden and our partners at Aspect Consulting are already on-board to help!

Stewardship Partners and Aspect Consulting staff at the Carnation Elementary School rain garden ribbon cutting and volunteer event.

But Aspect Consulting’s professional assistance, volunteering, and pro-bono work doesn’t stop at rain gardens. Later this fall, we are teaming up with Aspect at Carnation Farms to engage their staff in an Adopt-a-Buffer – planting native trees and shrubs on one of our biggest restoration sites along the Snoqualmie River.

Inspired? You can help, too! Visit our volunteer calendar to sign up for an event that fits your schedule. Our volunteer events are a great way to be a stewardship partner and are fun for the whole family!

New Salmon-Safe Farms Map!

We are very excited to launch our new, interactive Salmon-Safe farms map! After updating the Stewardship Partners website, we realized that our old farm map was also in need of a face lift.

In an effort to better champion the dedicated farmers who have achieved Salmon-Safe certification, this new map aims to get our supporters and consumers throughout the region to connect directly with the farms. Each farm’s pin provides a brief bio/statement from the farm along with a few photos and a link to the farms website when applicable.

We hope you find this new map both insightful and useful. We invite you to learn more about these farms and find ways you can connect with them! And continue to check back as we add more farms to the map and update it with more information about farm crops.

Support Stewardship Partners While You Shop

Stewardship Partners has been selected as one of two non-profit recipients for the Bag Donation Program at Whole Foods Market.

Bring your reusable shopping bags when you shop at Whole Foods Market between October 1 and December 31, then choose to donate your 10-cent-per-bag credit at checkout. Funds raised will support Stewardship Partners programs that promote clean water and healthy watersheds throughout Puget Sound.

Participating Whole Foods Market locations include Lynnwood, Redmond, Bellevue, Kirkland, Roosevelt Square, Interbay, Westlake and Chambers Bay. For more info and store addresses, visit wfm.com.

Word from the Board: Road Trip to Hansville

“Road trip!” was the operative instruction to Stewardship Partners’ board of directors. For September’s monthly board meeting, members grabbed early morning ferries from Seattle, then drove to Hansville at the northern tip of the Kitsap Peninsula. There, board member Barbara Snapp welcomed all with breakfast in the beach front home that’s been in her family for three generations. Set on a high bluff with a spectacular view looking northwest over Puget Sound toward Whidbey Island, it’s obvious why the Snapp family treasures the house and the location. After a beach walk, and with sunny weather with just a hint of fall, the board opted to sit outside for the business meeting. Many thanks to Barbara for hosting. Wish that all board meeting venues were so welcoming and spectacular.

—written by Gene Carlson

I’m a Stewardship Partner Campaign

You may have recently seen the faces of some of our supporters artfully displayed on bus sides and web banners around town. These are part of our new “I’m a Stewardship Partner” public awareness campaign, thanks to the pro-bono hard-work of Jill Marshall and Janice Merlino of Merlino Media Group and Cal McAllister, formerly of Wexley School for Girls.

The campaign features photographs, treated by local artist and musician, Brandon Milner.  These feature a few of our community of supporters expressing how Stewardship Partners helps them become caretakers of our land and water.

In the coming months, this campaign will continue to be featured throughout the Puget Sound region. Look for “I’m a Stewardship Partner,” on billboards, bus sides, on the radio and in digital, print, social media and more.

Read about our partners at: https://www.stewardshippartners.org/im-a-stewardship-partner-campaign/

Green Solutions to Stormwater Runoff

By now, you have probably heard that stormwater runoff is a looming threat to our Puget Sound. But the good news is that there are ways we can slow down and filter stormwater runoff, preventing pollutants from making it into our precious bodies of water. This video created by Sightline Institute features our very own Aaron Clark speaking about green infrastructure solutions to polluted stormwater runoff.

Report from the Field: Fun in the Sun with one of our New Partners

We often reference our 1,000 cups of coffee model for building partnerships. We kind of live and thrive by it. We believe building successful partnerships entails a lot of listening while sitting down and having several cups of coffee, talking face to face, discussing respective missions and figuring out how a new partnership can be mutually beneficial. In our case with Tableau, over the past 4 years or so we have probably exchanged over 1,000 emails before we had that first cup of coffee together on July 13th, 2018 out at Carnation Farms. As part of our Adopt-a-Buffer program we connected Tableau with Carnation Farms, so they could learn about an incredible local food source steeped in history and to help us restore the riparian habitat on the farm. We have some huge restoration goals there over the next few years and we really wanted Tableau to play a role on making those goals a reality. It was a hot day, but volunteers worked hard to restore over 3,000 square feet of fish and wildlife habitat along the Snoqualmie River. We look forward to the next cups of coffee with Tableau this fall when we invite them back out to the same site to plant native trees and shrubs!

Think your company would be interested in volunteering with us? Reach out to Chris LaPointe to find out more about the Adopt-a-Buffer program and ways to get involved!

Beneficial Venture’s Awards Stewardship Partners their First Grant

On June 15th, Stewardship Partners was awarded the first Beneficial Reinvestment Grant at Beneficial Venture‘s (BV) Launch Party at The Collective, Seattle. As Washington’s first social-purpose full-service real estate company, BV felt that their mission to support green and sustainable development was a great match for our hands-on approach to protecting Puget Sound. We are honored to have been recognized as a leader in people-powered conservation solutions. A portion of proceeds from every commercial, residential and land transaction by a Beneficial Ventures broker is donated to non-profits that help people and the planet. Learn more at www.beneficialventures.com.

Salmon-Safe Launches Green Bridges Pilot Study

For more than 80 years, polluted runoff from Seattle’s Aurora Bridge has been discharged untreated to Seattle’s Lake Washington Ship Canal, impacting migrating salmon and other aquatic life. That inspired environmentally innovative developer Mark Grey to join forces with Salmon-Safe to convene a multiple partnership to treat runoff through rain gardens, including at his Salmon-Safe certified Data 1 development project adjacent to the bridge.

Building on the success of the Aurora Bridge project, Salmon-Safe has expanded work to other bridges on the Lake Washington Ship Canal.  In the Fall of 2017, following a presentation by The Nature Conservancy regarding the research conducted for the Aurora Bridge, a private anonymous donor offered to fund a brief study to determine if the other 5 bridges which impact the Ship Canal had the potential for green infrastructure to mitigate stormwater runoff from the bridge deck spans.  Salmon-Safe retained KPFF Engineers to conduct the feasibility study and calculate the runoff. The runoff calculations are based on Seattle’s annual rainfall of 38 inches. In addition, KPFF identified a composite bridge deck material which could be used to replace the grating on four of the draw bridges and collect additional contaminated runoff that may have normally fallen through the grates. The product, Fiber Span, has been used in other parts of the country and has a good track record of life safety as well as noise reduction.

 

Approximately 98 million gallons of untreated stormwater enter the Lake Washington Ship Canal by way of roadway runoff from the six bridges that span the waterway. Image courtesy KPFF

 

Our Green Bridges Pilot Study included the Ballard Bridge, Fremont Bridge, I-5 Bridge, University Bridge, and Montlake Bridge.  With green infrastructure in mind, the scope of work was to determine the functionality of the existing runoff collection system, to quantify the extents of the collection basins, to develop new low impact development runoff collection and treatment strategies, and to locate adequate treatment sites.  City of Seattle utility maps and record drawings were the key sources used to gather information about each bridge and provided the means to create feasible runoff mitigation solutions.  Once the initial background information was obtained for each bridge, an approximate ratio of the bioretention area required to treat subsequent basin areas was used to size the treatment facilities.  In all, our team determined that with this commitment to bioretention we could collect and treat 98 million gallons of runoff per year and reduce the detrimental impacts that bridge runoff has on this important salmon migration corridor.


If you’d like to see Salmon-Safe inform other bridge design, you can start with the Magnolia Bridge retrofit project which is near other Salmon-Safe certified shoreline projects and in an area close to Elliott Bay. The comment period for Magnolia Bridge will remain open until Sunday, July 1.  Please visit: magnoliabridge.participate.online to participate. Let SDOT know that you’d like a third party like Salmon-Safe to review the design for fish friendly practices.